Join us, and Head Chef from the Kent Cookery School James Palmer Rosser, at an informal cookery demonstration: 6.00 – 8.00pm Wednesday 6th December, East Malling.

 

Kent kitchen showroom

James will be sharing his skills with us in the bespoke, hand-painted demonstration kitchen in our showroom at East Malling using the Wolf gas cooktop, Wolf M class oven, Wolf steam oven and warming drawer.

Early booking is recommended for this free event – click here now to reserve your place(s).

 

The event

Enjoy cooking scallops and bao pork buns with Head Chef of Kent Cookery School – James Palmer Rosser.

Kent cookery demonstration

See first hand how James prepares and cooks food – even get involved if you’d like to! Get top cookery tips and watch how James uses the leading-edge design and superior performance of Wolf appliances to full advantage.

Better still enjoy the fruits of James’s labour along with a chilled glass of Prosecco!

Please join us at this free social event and enjoy an opportunity to meet and learn from one of Kent’s top chefs in a relaxed, informal environment.

Numbers are limited so early booking is recommended – click here to reserve your place(s).

 

The chef – James Palmer Rosser

Kent cookery school

James has worked in a number of prestigious venues and cook alongside some famous names in the culinary world. These include working for the Roux brothers, cooking alongside Albert Roux serving at the Chelsea Flower Show, and working at Michelin-starred restaurant Thackery’s in Tunbridge Wells for a number of years.

His passion lies in using great seasonal produce and using unfamiliar cuts to create new and exciting dishes. His love of teaching has stretched from becoming a head chef then executive chef, to today at the Kent Cookery School where he enjoys sharing not only his skills but his wealth of culinary knowledge gathered over the years.

 

 

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